Broward County Warrant Search

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Florida Warrant Search

What is an Arrest Warrant in Broward County, and Why is it Issued?

A warrant is an official document issued that gives the authority of law enforcement to arrest a person if they are accused of committing a crime. In Broward County, Warrants for an individual’s arrest are almost always issued by a judge or a magistrate and are predicated on the existence of probable cause., which is a reasonable belief that the individual named in the warrant has committed a crime.

An arrest warrant contains information about the individual who is the subject of the warrant, including their name, date of birth, and a description of the alleged crime. Once a warrant for an individual’s arrest has been issued, law enforcement is authorized to take the individual into custody, and they may be held in jail until their arraignment or until they post bail.

If you have been named in an arrest warrant in Broward County, It is essential to accord the circumstance the level of importance that it warrants and to seek the advice of a legal professional with prior experience practicing criminal defense as soon as this is practically possible. A lawyer can assist you in understanding your legal rights and options, and they can also strive to negotiate a case resolution that is in your best interests. Hiring an attorney is the best way to protect your legal rights and interests.

Warrants are issued in Broward County for a variety of reasons, including but not limited to: arrest warrants, search warrants, and bench warrants.

Arrest warrants are issued when law enforcement has reason to suspect that a person is guilty of committing a crime based on the existence of probable cause. An arrest warrant authorizes law enforcement to arrest the individual named in the warrant and bring them into custody.

Search warrants are issued when law enforcement has probable cause to believe the evidence of a crime can be found at a specific location, such as a home, vehicle, or business. If law enforcement officials have a search warrant, they are legally allowed to enter the premises and seize any necessary evidence.

Bench warrants are issued when an individual fails to appear in court as required. A bench warrant authorizes law enforcement to arrest the individual named in the warrant and bring them before the court.

In all cases, A judge must issue a warrant, which must be accompanied by evidence of probable cause. This ensures that warrant searches are conducted legally and that the rights of individuals are protected.

Types of Warrants in Broward County

In Broward County, Florida, several types of warrants may be issued by the court:

  • Arrest warrant: An arrest warrant will be issued for a person when law enforcement officials have reasonable cause to believe that person has committed a crime and there is sufficient evidence to support this belief. This type of warrant authorizes law enforcement to arrest the individual named in the warrant and bring them into custody.
  • Search warrant: A search warrant is issued when law enforcement has probable cause to believe the evidence of a crime can be found at a specific location, such as a home, vehicle, or business. This type of warrant authorizes law enforcement to search the location and seize any evidence they find.
  • Bench warrant: If a person is required to appear in court but does not do so, the County court will issue a bench warrant for that person’s arrest and place them under arrest for the offense they committed. This type of warrant authorizes law enforcement to arrest the individual named in the warrant and bring them before the court.
  • Writ of attachment: a legal order that is issued by the court that grants law enforcement the ability to confiscate property to ensure that it can be used as collateral in a civil action. This authority is given to law enforcement to ensure that the property may be used.
  • Writ of execution: a legal order from the court that gives law enforcement the authority to take possession of the property to satisfy a judgment in a civil case.
  • Writ of habeas corpus (“must have the body” ): A writ of habeas corpus is a County court order requiring an individual detained to be brought before the court. This type of warrant is used to ensure that an individual is not being held in detention illegally.
  • Warrant for forfeiture: A warrant for forfeiture is a court order that authorizes law enforcement to seize property that is believed to be connected to a crime. This type of warrant may be issued in cases involving drug trafficking or money laundering.

The Process of Serving a Warrant in Broward County

The process of serving a warrant in Broward County, Florida, typically involves the following steps:

  • Issuance of the warrant: A warrant is issued by a judge when law enforcement has presented probable cause to show that a crime has been committed and that evidence can be found at a specific location, person, or property.
  • Preparation for service: Once a warrant has been issued, law enforcement will typically prepare for the service of the warrant by gathering any necessary resources, such as backup officers or specialized equipment.
  • Service of the warrant: The warrant is served by law enforcement officers who typically go to the location or address specified in the warrant and present the warrant to the person or property to be searched.
  • Search and seizure: Once the warrant has been served, law enforcement will search for the location or person specified in the warrant and seize any evidence they find that is related to the crime in question.
  • Arrest: If an arrest warrant has been issued, law enforcement will arrest the individual named on the warrant and take them into custody.

The process of serving a warrant in Broward County must be done under the Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, which protects individuals against unreasonable searches and seizures. Individuals subject to a warrant search have the right to an attorney and should contact one as soon as it is feasible if they have any questions about their rights or the process of serving a warrant in Broward County.

Broward County has a new administrative order that releases individuals arrested for minor offenses without requiring them to post bail or go to court. The order aims to address the inequality in the bail system and reduce the number of people held in custody for minor offenses. Jailers will now decide whether to hold low-level offenders in jail or release them before seeing a judge. The order was a collaboration between the Broward Sheriff, State Attorney’s Office, and Public Defender’s Office and will be reviewed after one year.

How to Conduct a Broward County Warrant Search?

A Broward County warrant search can be conducted to determine if a person has an outstanding warrant for their arrest or if a search warrant has been issued for a specific location. Here are some steps to conduct a warrant search in Broward County:

Check online resources: Several online resources can be used to search for warrants in Broward County. The Broward County Clerk of Courts website provides a search tool for active warrants, and the Broward County Sheriff’s Office provides an online inmate search tool to check for arrest warrants. Here are some of the best online websites & resources for conducting a Broward County warrant search:

  • Broward County Clerk of Courts: The Clerk of Courts website provides an online search tool to search for active warrants in Broward County.
  • Broward County Sheriff’s Office: The Sheriff’s Office provides an online inmate search tool to check for active arrest warrants in Broward County.
  • Florida Department of Law Enforcement: The FDLE does have a state wide warrant search tool that allows you to search for active warrants in Broward County.
  • Online warrant databases: Several online databases provide information about active warrants in Broward County. Some of these databases are free, while others require a fee for access.
  • Private investigator websites: Some private investigators offer online warrant search services, which can provide comprehensive information about active warrants in Broward County.

Contact the Broward County Clerk of Courts: The Clerk of Courts is responsible for maintaining records of all warrants issued in Broward County. You can contact the Clerk of Courts by phone or in-person to request information about a warrant search.

Contact the Broward County Sheriff’s Office: The Sheriff’s Office serves warrants and can provide information about active warrants and warrants searches. You can contact the Sheriff’s Office by phone or in person to request information about a warrant search. Here is a list of departments within the Broward County Sheriff’s Office that are related to public records & warrants:

  • Records Division: The Records Division in the sheriff’s office is responsible for maintaining and distributing records related to law enforcement activities, including arrest records, incident reports, and warrant records.
  • Identification Section: The Identification Section maintains fingerprints, photographs, and other biometric data records.
  • Crime Analysis Unit: The Crime Analysis Unit analyzes crime data, including arrest records, and identifies criminal activity trends and patterns.
  • Property and Evidence Section: The Property and Evidence Section is responsible for safeguarding and storing seized property and evidence, which may include records related to searches and seizures.
  • Accreditation and Policy Division: The Accreditation and Policy Division is responsible for developing and maintaining policies and procedures for collecting, storing, and disseminating public records.

Hire a private investigator: If you prefer a more comprehensive warrant search, you can hire a private investigator with access to additional resources and databases to conduct a warrant search.

Conducting a warrant search in Broward County can be complex, and it’s recommended that you seek the assistance of a professional if you have any questions or concerns about the process. Additionally, individuals subject to a warrant search have the right to an attorney and should contact one as soon as possible if they have questions about their rights or the warrant search process.